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Everycontractor.com  > >  Expert Articles  > >    > >  PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN : “The Balance Beam”
 
 
 
PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN : “The Balance Beam”
 
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November 29th, 2007
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p class="MsoNormal">There is something about some places, like well-done hotel lobbies, that just makes them appear perfect, but what is that magical something and how did it happen? font face="Arial">
br />
/font> br /> Designers use basic principles of design, which achieve good form in a room. span style="">  /span>Good design is defined as design which has some, if not all, of these elements: balance, focus, rhythm, harmony, unity, contrast, and emphasis. Using these will yield a room with that fabulous, flawless appearance we crave. font face="Arial">
br />
/font> br /> Briefly, over the next few articles, I will discuss all the above principles and give you a better idea of how to apply them. span style="">  /span>For now, let’s start with the concept of “balance”, one of the most important factors in design. span style="">  /span> font face="Arial">
/font> font face="Arial"> br />
/font> br /> Balance is a state in which the elements of a composition achieve a harmonious, satisfying equilibrium, with nothing that is out of proportion or overemphasized to the detriment of the other parts. span style="">  /span> font face="Arial">
/font> font face="Arial"> br />
/font> br /> Balance assumes great importance because every room contains a variety of elements of different shapes, colors, patterns, textures, lines, and light. span style="">  /span>A room’s purpose may determine many of the elements it will contain, but all of these must come together to make a pleasing, comfortable place. Balance depends on the idea of the visual weight and the placement of all the elements within a space, as opposed to their actual measurements or weight. span style="">  /span> font face="Arial"> /font> font face="Arial">
/font> font face="Arial"> br />
/font> br /> Here are some basic “balance” tenants. Elements that are more heavily textured or detailed, have more visual weight than plain elements. span style="">  /span>For instance, an elaborate antique sideboard has more weight than a plain shaker style one. span style="">  /span>In working with the antique sideboard, don’t put too much complexity around it. Put more textural fabrics away from it, to balance the visual weight of the objects in the room. font face="Arial">
/font> font face="Arial"> br />
/font> br /> Next and obviously, among objects with similar shapes, forms, colors and textures, larger objects weight more than smaller ones. span style="">  /span>Also, multiple smaller objects closely grouped together can balance a single object of similar area. For example, if you have a large object, such as a piano, in one corner of a room, you can create balance across from it with several small objects, such as three plants of varying sizes. span style="">  /span> font face="Arial">
/font> font face="Arial"> br />
/font> br /> Next, dark colors lend heavier weight to elements than do lighter shades, and bright colors carry more visual weight than neutral colors. span style="">  /span>I would not put two bright pink pianos across from each other. span style="">  /span>Let one bright pink piano stand out, and do something more neutral across from it, but which will have similar visual weight in either quantity or texture. Lastly, shapes that are visually complex or unusual in nature have more weight than more simple shapes. span style="">  /span> font face="Arial">
/font> font face="Arial"> br />
/font> br /> A more formal traditional design typically works best in a symmetrical layout. Symmetry, a form of balance, is the result of arranging identical elements in opposition about a common axis. You can create a focal point such as with a firepl
 
 
Posted: 11/29/2007 12:34:18 PM by Brenda Weiss | with 0 Comments Filed under: .

        
 
 
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